Reblog If You Can Take Off Your Bra Without Taking Your Shirt Off.

mis-c3l-la-neous:

themishamigosofthemishapocalypse:

50eathaters:

image   

Girl’s are amazing

I think we broke the notes…

i feel like i’m reblogging history. “the post that broke the notes”

maybe more appropriately titled “the one where we break the notes”

Fashion is one of the very few forms of expression in which women have more freedom than men. And I don’t think it’s an accident that it’s typically seen as shallow, trivial, and vain. It is the height of irony that women are valued for our looks, encouraged to make ourselves beautiful and ornamental… and are then derided as shallow and vain for doing so. And it’s a subtle but definite form of sexism to take one of the few forms of expression where women have more freedom, and treat it as a form of expression that’s inherently superficial and trivial. Like it or not, fashion and style are primarily a women’s art form. And I think it gets treated as trivial because women get treated as trivial.

Greta Christina, Fashion is a Feminist Issue  (via conceptnoir)

And it is not surprising that even though fashion is seen as frivolous, trivial, and superficial for women, men hold some of the top positions and are some of the top designers in the entire fashion field. That a man can be succeed in the fashion industry and be lauded for forever but women are just seen as “oh she likes shopping and that is why she is into fashion”. You see what is going on here again?

(via porcinebibliophile)

Reblogged from Monsieur Bombardier

forthewinoswin:

rachelisaflameprincess:

bendydicks:

considerthishippie:

Instead of just looking up into the sky, you’re actually gazing down into the infinite cosmic abyss, with only gravity holding you onto the surface of the earth.

oh

i was not prepared for that

and now, the weather

Reblogged from Monsieur Bombardier

Emma Kisiel holds a bachelor of fine arts with an emphasis in photography from the University of Colorado Denver. “At Rest” is a photographic series depicting roadkill on American highways and addressing our human fear of confronting death and viewing the dead. Kisiel’s images draw attention to the fact that, while man has a vast impact on animal and natural life, dominant American religions insist that animals do not have a place in Heaven and are, therefore, of little value in our society. To cause the viewer to feel struck by this truth, Kisiel photographs memorials she builds surrounding roadkill at the location at which its life was taken. “At Rest” expresses the sacredness to the bodies of animals accidentally hit by vehicles while crossing the road.

Reblogged from DELIGHTED PERSON
press-x-to-sad:

WIN ALL THE POINTS. Especially purple pony points. Also dollarbucks.

press-x-to-sad:

WIN ALL THE POINTS. Especially purple pony points.
Also dollarbucks.

Reblogged from Inspirations

railroadsoftware:

jerkidiot:

creepfag:

badgoku14:

lets bring rick roll back lol

you should actually check out this article on why we shouldn’t

that actually makes some really good points

thought that link would lead to a rick roll

Reblogged from John Green's tumblr
When I was a student at Cambridge I remember an anthropology professor holding up a picture of a bone with 28 incisions carved in it. “This is often considered to be man’s first attempt at a calendar,” she explained. She paused as we dutifully wrote this down. “My question to you is this – what man needs to mark 28 days? I would suggest to you that this is woman’s first attempt at a calendar.”
It was a moment that changed my life. In that second I stopped to question almost everything I had been taught about the past. How often had I overlooked women’s contributions? How often had I sped past them as I learned of male achievement and men’s place in the history books? Then I read Rosalind Miles’s book “The Women’s History of the World” (recently republished as “Who Cooked the Last Supper?”) and I knew I needed to look again. History is full of fabulous females who have been systematically ignored, forgotten or simply written out of the records. They’re not all saints, they’re not all geniuses, but they do deserve remembering.
— Sandi Toksvig, ‘Top 10 unsung heroines’  (via starbuckara)
Tags: feminist

The Kidnapping of a King: How the media has sanitized the legacy of Dr. King

lacigreen:

subversivesentences:

             image

Today marks the 28th Martin Luther King Jr. Day.  It also marks 28 years of reducing the legacy of radical social justice and antiwar activist into that of loving quotes on racial reconciliation. Ultimately, think back to what you were taught about Dr. King and you’ll most likely remember his role in bus boycotts, sit-ins, and famous speeches. Like the memorial erected for him in Washington D.C., the meaning of Dr. King’s legacy has been ossified by the establishment into one of nonviolence and love.  What you are not taught is that Dr. King’s concept of love manifested in his theories on social justice, economic equity, human rights, and global war. Today, the establishment that hated Dr. King markets an illusion of who he was.  I’ll let the good Doctor make his own case:

 On war, capitalism, and civil rights

“I am convinced that if we are to get on the right side of the world revolution, we as a nation must undergo a radical revolution of values. We must rapidly begin the shift from a thing-oriented society to a person-oriented society. When machines and computers, profit motives and property rights are considered more important than people, the giant triplets of racism, materialism, and militarism are incapable of being conquered.”

 On economic justice 

“True compassion is more than flinging a coin to a beggar; it comes to see that an edifice which produces beggars needs restructuring. ”

On internal colonialism

“The purpose of the slum is to confine those who have no power and perpetuate their powerlessness. The slum is little more than a domestic colony which leaves its inhabitants dominated politically, exploited economically, segregated and humiliated at every turn.”

On Jim Crow as both racial and class warfare 

"The Southern aristocracy took the world and gave the poor white man Jim Crow," King lectured from the Alabama Capitol steps, following the 1965 march on Selma. "And when his wrinkled stomach cried out for the food that his empty pockets could not provide, he ate Jim Crow, a psychological bird that told him that no matter how bad off he was, at least he was a white man, better than a black man."

**

You were probably taught that Dr. King’s harshest critics were white southerners and more radical elements within the movement like Malcolm X. The truth is that during his life the mainstream media criticized Dr. King. On his stance on the Vietnam War, Life magazine described his speeches as “demagogic slander that sounded like a script for Radio Hanoi.”

During his life, Dr. King was not well received by the establishment. In the years since his death in 1968, his image and political significance has been sanitized and neutralized. He serves as a mouthpiece for love and compassion as the keys of historical progress. What one should remember, was that Dr. King was intensely critical of the capitalist state, global war, and separating economic rights from civil rights. What Dr. King was for was protest, education and direct action. If you truly honor Dr. King and his legacy, you honor the core values of what he stood for.

really important thing to be aware of as we celebrate Dr. King’s birthday today.

Reblogged from Sex+